Undergraduate FAQ

1. I enrolled at Cal State prior to several changes in the Health Science degree requirements listed in the current Bulletin. Which degree requirements should I follow?

Admissions and Records will automatically place you under the Bulletin for the year you entered Cal State (not the year you declared or changed your major). If you would like to graduate under more recent program requirements, complete a "Change of Major" form in the Office of Admissions and Records (UH 107) and identify the more recent Bulletin under which you wish to graduate.

2. I need to complete my Clear Credential. Which health education course do I need to take?

Ryan Credential Candidates should take HSCI 440: School Health Issues for Educators. Ryan candidates who are working in a classroom setting may also enroll in HSCI 540: School Health Programs and Practices. “2042” candidates must take HSCI 540 during their classroom induction phase.

3. I am interested in adding Health Science as a Supplemental Authorization to my teaching credential. Do I need to complete a minor in Health Science?

You do not need to complete an academic minor in Health Science. However, you need to pass the California Subject Examination for Teachers (CSET). Recommended courses to prepare you for this examination include: Health - An Ecological Approach (HSCI 120); Drug and Alcohol Use and Abuse (HSCI 364); Health and Human Sexuality (HSCI 310); and Nutrition for Your Health (HSCI 342). Because state requirements change frequently, be sure to check with the CASE office.

4. I am a liberal studies major and would like to choose Health as my concentration. Which courses should I take?

A concentration requires 18 credits, currently including HSCI 120, HSCI 342, HSCI 364, HSCI 310, and others. As these requirements may change, please consult the PALS office.

5. What types of careers are available to Health Services Administration graduates?

Both the undergraduate and graduate programs prepare the student for careers as program managers, project analysts, mid-level supervisory positions, department head and senior level positions in hospitals, medical groups, health maintenance organizations, insurance companies, public health agencies, the State and Federal government, and long term care facilities.

6. How does one find health care management position upon graduation?

Many organizations maintain web sites that list job openings in addition to the newspaper classified ads. Networking with current employees of health care organizations is also an effective way of learning about jobs.

7. Does membership in a professional organization help get a job?

Yes. Membership in the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE) as a Student Chapter member is excellent preparation for a career in management. Other important organizations to consider are the Medical Group Management Association, Healthcare Executives of Southern California, and Women in Healthcare Administration. Health Education, Nutrition and Dietetics, and Environmental Health also feature student memberships in professional organizations. Consult a program advisor.

8. What is Environmental Health?

Environmental Health is a challenging and dynamic field that focuses on the preservation of natural resources and improvement of environmental factors, such as the quality of air, water, food, land, housing and other biological and chemical elements that affect the health and safety of the community.

9. What does an Environmental Health Specialist do?

As a member of a local environmental health agency, a Registered Environmental Health Specialist (REHS) enforces environmental and public health laws in the community, as well as provides education on environmental health issues. An Environmental Health Specialist may also be called upon to:

RESPOND to public health threats, such as chemical spills or natural disasters
INVESTIGATE source and transmission of disease-causing organisms
INSPECT regulated businesses, such as a food facility, hazardous waste generator
REVIEW legislation dealing with environmental health issues
ENFORCE federal, state and local environmental health regulations

10. Where does an Environmental Health Specialist fit in?

Environmental Health Specialist’s skills may be applied in a variety of programs designed to protect and serve the public. Some of these programs include:

Food and beverage protection
Milk and dairy products inspection
Water supply protection
Recreational water and swimming pool safety
Housing and institutional safety
Solid and liquid waste management
Vector surveillance and control
Hazardous material management
Medical waste management
Land use and development

11. How can you become an Environmental Health Specialist?

The Department of Health Science offers a Bachelor of Science in Health Science with a concentration in Environmental Health Science. Graduates from this program meet the academic and experience requirements for admission to the State of California Environmental Health Specialist Registration examination.

12. Does CSUSB offer undergraduate and graduate programs in Health Services Administration?

Yes. Consult the Health Services Administration website or CSUSB Bulletin of Course for Specific requirements.

13. Does membership in a professional organization help get a job?

Yes. Membership in the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE) as a Student Chapter member is excellent preparation for a career in management. Other important organizations to consider are the Medical Group Management Association, Healthcare Executives of Southern California, and Women in Healthcare Administration. Health Education memberships in the American Public Health Association, the Society for Public Health Education, or the Association for School Health Education is an important part of being a professional. Nutrition and Dietetics, and Environmental Health also feature student memberships in professional organizations. Membership benefits include national meetings, journals, local chapters to enrich ones professional experiences, and a job mart. Consult a program advisor.

14. Where does a community health education graduate work?

Community health educators work in public health agencies like county health departments; in community-based organizations working in content areas like family planning, substance abuse, HIV/AIDS, child and adolescent health, cardiovascular disease, health promotion, nutrition; in hospitals and clinics including community health centers; in corporate settings to promote healthy behaviors in employees; and in tribal health centers and Indian Health Service settings.

15. What roles does a community health educator have in community health?

Health educators plan, implement, and evaluate health programs to improve health for all. Community health is a multi-sectoral profession so health educators network across many disciplines in an attempt to develop comprehensive programs that bridge household, corporate, school, medical, and environmental concerns in social, political, and economic contexts. Health educators organize communities for action, seek to influence public policy and law, establish health programs to create healthier environments, and provide programs to impact healthy personal behaviors.

16. What is a Certified Health Education Specialist?

A certification as a Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) indicates that a student has completed a specified course of study preparing the graduate to have a body of knowledge and set of skills to competently perform the tasks and responsibilities required of a health educator. A national body, the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, administers a national test that health education graduates can take. Areas that are tested include responsibility areas of:

I. The health educator, working with individuals, groups, and organizations is responsible for assessing individual and community needs for health education

II. The health educator, working with individuals, groups, and organizations is responsible for planning effective health education programs.

III. The health educator, working with individuals, groups, and organizations is responsible for implementing health education programs.

IV. The health educator, working with individuals, groups, and organizations is responsible for evaluating effectiveness of health education programs.

V. The health educator, working with individuals, groups, and organizations is responsible for coordinating provisions of health education services.

VI. The health educator, working with individuals, groups, and organizations is responsible for acting as a resource person in health education.

VII. The health educator, working with individuals, groups, and organizations is responsible for communicating health and health education needs, concerns, and resources.

17. What job title would a community health educator have?
In community-based organizations and corporate settings, titles might include health educator, health coordinator, program director, health promoter; in public health agencies, classifications would include health education specialist I, II, or III as well as program director.